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20121224
20130101
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
for the jefes. >> glor: john blackstone, thank rou. john mentioned the fiscal cliff. tinight we've learned democrats emocraw moving ahead on their hei plan to avoid it now that talks have broken down with john boehner. white house and congressional leaders have until january 1 to lork out a budget deal. resident obama is in hawaii on udget dn. nancy cordes is there as well. nancy, good evening. nancy, goor: jeff, this would : sentially be a last-ditch effort to avert the fiscal ially be sources tell us that aides to the president have been in talks preliminary talks, with aides to senate majority leader harry elf who himself was here in hawaii this weekend for the funeral of senator daniel inouye. eid is now working, we're told, on a smaller package than the comprehensive deal than the president was working on with speaker boehner. than tmall package would prevent tax rates from rising for middle-class, perhaps cut some spending and tie up a few other loose ends. so far, though, senator reid has so fbeen in touch with republicans over this plan. blicans ovent and the first lady as you men
were so close to the fiscal cliff deadline. >> glor: nancy cordes, thank you. major garrett has been following developments at the white house. major, what is the president's next move? >> reporter: it is not a breakthrough but it is a glimmer of hope. officials tell cbs news the president will meet with harry reid, mitch, house speaker john boehner, democratic leader nancy pelosi tomorrow afternoon at the white house. to try to find out if there is a way to avert the fiscal cliff. today, after the president returned from his vacation in hawaii, he did meet with his senior advisors. they did conduct some back- channel negotiations as they have been during the holidays on a bill to possibly avert the fiscal cliff. those talks i'm told did not make much progress. the face-to-face conversations may fact create the possibility of a breakthrough. but right now the president has no new proposals to give his congressional leaders. he will stick with what he told the nation on friday-- raise income taxes for households earning more than $250,000, extend unemployment benefits for those americ
come into nare their paychecks. and is still potential for the fiscal cliff to do a lot of damage. >> susie: we are going to betalking about fiscal cliff for a long time darren you better goat that crystal ball in good shape. >> i'm polishing it tonight. >> susie: thank you very muchdarren gersh our washington burp bureau chief. >> still ahead the most iconicnew year's eve set sill celebrations >> reporter: still ahead, we'll take a look at the business behind the world's most iconic new year's eve celebration. >> susie: to the surprise of many investors, 2012 ended up being a fairly good year for the stock market. the dow rose over 7%, the nasdaq gained even more, up almost 16%, and the s&p closed the year with a 13% gain. erika miller takes a closer look at the forces driving stocks this year. >> reporter: many investors are asking themselves why the stock market did so well this year when the economy was so weak? the answer is the fed. >> you have to give them a good deal of the credit. they have had quantitative easing again and again. bernanke has said he does not want us to
today, as the fiscal cliff drama in washington continues to weigh on markets and confidence. gold slipped almost $8 to $1,655. for the year, gold is up about 5% half the gain in the s&p 500. but as erika miller reports some gold bugs believe next year will be far better for the precious metal. >> reporter: if you got gold jewelry as a holiday gift, it may be more than something beautiful to wear. it may also prove to be a shining investment. some gold traders think the yellow metal could hit $2,000 an ounce next year. the reason? >> monetary easing. all these governments have debt and there's only one way to pay it back and it's to devalue their own currency. and it's a race to the bottom. >> reporter: there are other factors that could also help support gold prices. central banks worldwide have been boosting their gold holdings to diversify their portfolios, and protect against inflation. this year, central banks bought roughly 500 metric tons of gold, up 8% from last year. in addition, many small investors are buying gold as a safehaven from global instability. >> political cert
the impact if lawmakers fail to reach a deal on the fiscal cliff. bimultibillion-dollar aid bill may be a casualty of the casuemate. the ripple effects would be felt far from the fields. we asked anna warner to look into that. >> reporter: eagle lake, texas, depends on rice. it's been grown here since the 1800s. drought is usually the biggest threat, but the nervous talk in the drugstore now is about congress. >> without the farm bill, it really makes it uncertain for ehat you should do next year. >> reporter: steve is a pharmacist here and a rice farmer. the people are nervous. >> very nervous. wh reporter: what are they saying when they're coming in? what are you hearing? >> "what do we do?" you know, they don't know what to do. ht's so uncertain right now that the banks don't know what to do. the farmers don't know what it do. they're out there plowing the land, getting it all prepared for next year, with total cecertainty. >> reporter: at stake, $154 billion in federal farm aid and isop insurance, sidelined by the fiscal cliff stalemate. benefits from the farm bill also guarantee
, and the legislation they came up with, jeff, contributed o the fiscal cliff that we're facing right now. >> glor: the president says this just keeps happening again and again. nancy cordes, thank you. income taxes won't be the only taxes going up if there's no agreement. estate taxes paid by those who inherit property will also jump. here's john blackstone. >> reporter: jeff page owns 120- cre vineyard in california's napa valley. but when his great-grandfather started farming here in the late 1800s, this was cattle country. >> both sides of the family came en before the turn of the century, and farmed orchard fruit and cattle. he reporter: but much of the land he grew up on is gone, sold to pay estate taxes after his grandfather's death. had land back in the hills over there? >> yeah. >> reporter: had to sell it all. >> had to sell all of it? i reporter: estate tax? >> yes. >> reporter: his grandfather died in 1972 when estate taxes were at an all-time high: 77%. >> it was a big tax bill. it was half-a-million dollars. we sold off 150 acres; gave us hemething to pay the tax with. >> reporter: n
ticks toward the fiscal cliff. nancy cordes is with the president in honolulu. nancy? >> reporter: jim, the president is trading the sand for snowy washington. he'll be back in the nation's capital by mid-morning tomorrow, and most of the u.s. senate will be attempting to get back there by then, as well. but house leaders have not given their members the signal to return to washington and say they won't until the u.s. senate passes a bill to avert the fiscal cliff. as the president wrapped up his vacation, federal workers trickled back into the nation's capital. but the only people who can avert the fiscal cliff, members of the house and senate, have not returned, and, in just six days, a 2% payroll tax is set to expire, along with the bush era tax cuts, shrinking the average workers' paycheck in 2013 by about $1,500. long-term unemployment benefits for about two million jobless americans are also set to expire, and $110 billion worth of spending cuts to both domestic and defense programs will start to kick in, forcing layoffs in the public sector and for some private sector government
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)